The Best of WikiLeaks/CableGate

I was tired of hearing about what the news networks wanted me to hear about, so I went to the source of CableGate, WikiLeaks.  Yes, I lead such a boring life that I have hours to sift through recently-leaked classified documents.  This stuff is almost as sexy as PerezHilton.com!  Here are 10 secret documents that I was interested in leading:

  1. 10KUWAIT142 – from the Embassy in Kuwait, the cable from the Ministry of the Interior of Kuwait voiced his concern that “Iran is intent upon exporting its revolution and Shi’ism, has a gameplan, and will only be deterred from achieving its objectives – including nuclear weapons capability – by force.”  You can also read a similar cable in 10KUWAIT88.
  2. 09ABUDHABI736 – another national security cable about Iran.  Timothy Geithner talked to the Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi, who expressed “serious concern over Iran’s regional intentions and pleaded for the U.S. to shorten its decision-making timeline and develop a ‘Plan B.'”  He also described a nuclear armed Iran as absolutely untenable.
  3. 07STATE152317 – President Bush talked with Chinese President Hu about concerns that China was shipping missile components to North Korea.
  4. 05ANKARA1730 – a confidential memo from 2005 concerning Turkey.  The memo says that Turkey is in a period of policy drift… having no direction, and the AKP’s parliamentary majority eroding.
  5. 07ANKARA648 – two years later, another memo on the AKP, the leading political party in Turkey.  For two years, they’ve been pursuing moderate legislation, which has quelled (a little bit) concerns over them having a “secret Islamist agenda.”
  6. 07HARARE638 – from Harare, Zimbabwe, a cable entitled “The End is Near” (how is that for an eye-catcher?).  Robert Mugabe, the current president of Zimbabwe, “has survived so long because he is more clever and more ruthless than any other politician in Zimbabwe.”  This cable was from 2007, and in 2008, Robert Mugabe was almost kicked out of office in an election, and there was a lot of violence as Mugabe desperately tried to hold on to the office.
  7. 08ASTANA760 – revealing that the U.S. is keeping intelligence on foreign leaders, a confidential cable from Astana, Kazakhstan follows the lives of the leaders of Kazakhstan, revealing their skiing habits, their nightclub habits, them having private concerts with Elton John (paying 1 million pounds).
  8. 10SEOUL272 – from South Korea, concern from the Vice Foreign Minister that China would not be able to stop North Korea’s collapse following Kim Jong-Il’s death.  He commented that “China had far less influence on North Korea ‘than most people believe.'”  There was also some general name-calling about a Chinese official, calling him “the most incompetent official in China,” and wondering how in the world he had kept his post.
  9. 09TELAVIV936 – A codel visited Tel Aviv, and met with Prime Minister Netanyahu in April 2009.  They discussed a nuclear Iran (Netanyahu said that “learning to live with a nuclear Iran would be a big mistake which would lead to a different, more dangerous world”) and Netanyahu’s approach to the Palestinians (“Reviewing a now familiar formula, Netanyahu said he will approach the Palestinians on parallel political, economic and security tracks”).
  10. 09LONDON1385 – the only cable (from June 2009) that mentions Nigeria, which I have a certain bent toward, expresses concern about Nigeria “punching well below its weight” because of the illness of President Yar’Adua.  That might lead to a constitutional crisis.

What have you heard about WikiLeaks?  Do you care?

  • http://www.nurturedmoms.com/ Heather

    The diplomatic cables were the most interesting part of the whole thing to me, too. I guess national leaders insulting each other in secret messages is funny. I liked the one where the King (?) of Saudi Arabia says the president of Pakistan is weak, but is apparently his friend in real life. I guess heads of state aren’t too much different from normal folk after all.

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