Ten Specific Problems with the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

A while back, I wrote a post on the U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child, which was a horrible treaty that would restrict the rights of parents to raise their children, and subject the United States to the whims of an international body, instead of being able to make its own laws in this arena.  You can read my post here.

Well, the U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child was not passed by the Senate (thankfully), but now a new treaty is coming before the U.S. Senate: the U.N. Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.  It’s equally bad, and should not be approved by the Senate.  Here are ten specific problems with this treaty.  I’m reprinting these ten reasons from ParentalRights.org’s president Michael Farris (you can see the original PDF version here):

  1. Any remaining state sovereignty on the issue of disability law will be entirely eliminated by the ratification of this treaty. The rule of international law is that the nation-state that ratifies the treaty has the obligation to ensure compliance. This gives Congress total authority to legislate on all matters regarding disability law—a power that is substantially limited today. Article 4(5) makes this explicit.
  2. Article 4(1)(a) demands that all American law on this subject be conformed to the standards of the UN.
  3. Article 4(1)(e) remands that “every person, organization, or private enterprise” must eliminate discrimination on the basis of disability. On its face, this means that every home owner would have to make their own home fully accessible to those with disabilities. If the UN wants to make exceptions, perhaps they could. But, on its face, this is the meaning of the treaty.
  4. Article 4(1)(e) also means that the legal standard for the number of handicapped spaces required for parking at your business, private school, or house of worship will be established by the UN—not your local government.
  5. Article 4(2) requires the United States to use its maximum resources for compliance with these standards. The UN has interpreted similar provisions in the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child to criticize nations who spend too much on military issues and not enough on social programs. There is every reason to believe that the UN would interpret these provisions in a similar fashion. The UN believes that it has the power to determine the legitimacy and lawfulness of the budget of the United States to assess compliance with such treaties.
  6. Article 6(2) is a backdoor method of requiring the United States to comply with the general provisions of the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women. This treaty enshrines abortion rights, homosexual rights, and demands the complete disarmament of all people.
  7. Article 7(2) advances the identical standard for the control of children with disabilities as is contained in the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. This means that the government—acting under UN directives—gets to determine for all children with disabilities what the government thinks is best.
  8. Article 25 on Education does not repeat the parental rights rules of earlier human rights treaties such as the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights or the International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights. This is an important omission. Coupling this omission with the direct declaration of “the best interest of the child” standard in Article 7(2), this convention is nothing less than the complete eradication of parental rights for the education of children with disabilities.
  9. Article 15’s call for a ban on “inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment” is the exact same language used in the UN CRC which has been authoritatively interpreted to ban any spanking by parents. It should be noted that Article 15 is not limited to persons with disabilities. It says “no one shall be subjected to … inhuman or degrading treatment.” This means that spanking will be banned entirely in the United States.
  10. The United States, as a wealthy nation, would be obligated to fund disability programs in nations that could not afford their own programs under the dictates of Article 4(2). This is what “the framework of international cooperation” means.

Please call your Senators and ask them to vote No on this terrible treaty.  Click here to find out how you can take action.